A couple of years ago I wrote some posts on Ventis (Ventis solar energy and Ventis Fresh Air) and have now decided to take the next step and install it in my own house.

So this is it, the rubber hitting the road.

Over the next couple of weeks I will be collecting data on my roof temperature, outside temperature, inside temperatures and inside CO2 levels. Then I can compare it with the final results.

There are a couple of obvious disclaimers about this experiment. The first is that I am collecting results leading into summer and then comparing it with summer results. But since this is Sydney we are just as likely to have ultra hot weather now and not in summer.

The second is that the worse things are, the more likely I am to turn on the airconditioner. What this means is that the temperature will look good, but my power bill will look bad. If the Ventis system works, I won’t be turning on the airconditioning.

On the Ventis web site they have two reports that show an unoccupied house and the results are consistent with what I would expect, and what they promise. But it doesn’t show CO2 levels and if the place is unoccupied, they will remain constant anyway.

I think I surprised the sales rep because I could rattle off the benefits of the system and quote the statistics. It helps when you sell CO2 desktop displays and know every moment of the day what the CO2 levels are in your office and house.

So let’s see if I remain one of Ventis’ biggest fans (is that a bad pun?).

And if you would like to test the CO2 levels in your own place then check out the KeepAlert Desktop CO2 Meter.